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ambassador tom pickerring and admiral mike mulling, -- mullen. they were frank, and they are two of america's most distinguished and capable public servants. ambassador pickering served as under secretary to the state department and ambassador to india, russia, israel, and other important nations. admiral mullen, as we know, chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. i think that their backgrounds, their service to the country showed up starkly in the quality of the boards report, and i want to thank them for their extraordinary service to our country and i want to thank secretary clinton who appointed them, who selected them. the report pulls no punches. it tackles head on many of the questions we've been asking. the report makes 29 recommendations in total, five of which are classified. secretary clinton has embraced every single one of them, in fact, she's gone above and beyond board's recommendations by taking immediate steps to strengthen security at high threat posts and request from congress the authority to reprogram funds to increase diplomatic security spending by $1.3 billion. you kn
. then he is scheduled to come back to america. now another one of his luckiest experiences. they have a transport plane to take him to america. his arm is gone by then. he is told we don't have room for another litter. another patient on the air plane. you can't go he was disappointed but the plane crashed and killed everybody on the plane. so dan inouye was a person who considered himself lucky. those of us who knew senator inouye consider ourself lucky, just being able to know the man. after hawaii received statehood in 1959. he was their first congressman. three years later he was a electricitied to the senate and has been a soft, powerful voice for the people of hawaii ever since. the many personal courtesies he has extended me i will never forget. may not seem like much. but i had something and i was scheduled to be in florida, and i had promoted this great senator inouye was going to be there. and i got a call from henie en -- henry, who was long-time senator inouye's chief of staff. he checked the schedule and it's his wife's birthday and he can't go. i said i understand that
. in this unnatural the receipt tendencies towards further integration increasing all over the road in america, north america, asia and we should not only stay way from that. on the contrary, we should see all the advantages we have and our commonwealth and actually our neighbors are becoming increasingly interested in integration and so. we have a very pragmatic attitude to the free trade zone project, cas and actually i would like to thank parliament for ratifying this document first. they made positive examples. the common economic space. all these things are already working affect the really. colleagues, citizens of russia, we aimed at doubling russia's gdp. by the end of 2008, we came very close to that inch mark. the global financial crisis -- by the time for the crisis we've managed to increase russia's gdp by 85% but still, we have demonstrated the capability of the russian economy to develop and to grow at a rapid pace. we've managed to preserve our potential for growth in outlining the prospects for itself, starting from 1999, russia's gdp per capita has doubled. the spending for the federa
to be learned. first, america cannot retreat from a dangerous world. it is important for us to be there, not only protecting values, but american citizens. those who represent us overseas better protection. not only does in uniforms, but this in site are to have important missions to perform. third, a break down on september september 11 that is stark and challenging to all of us in public life. i went through the litany of things given to us by the accountability review board. intelligence fell short. security personnel were inexperienced and unprepared. security systems failed. our host nation was lacking in protection for our own people and senior state department officials unfortunately showed a lack of leadership in energy and ability. that is a challenge to all of us. it's a challenge to assess this in an honest fashion and change policy to the resources and please don't make a difference. finally, we can provide protection for americans representing us in our nation require without adequate resources, without a security plan that is reliable and without leadership, which understa
harbor bringing america to world war with. veterans and the families marking anniversary at the world war ii memorial in washington, d.c. this the ceremony includes remarks by the vice chairman of the joint chief. [sirens] ♪ ♪ ♪ ?eet ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ladies and gentlemen, will be delivered by lieutenant colonel. >> our help is in the name of the lord who made help and earth. the souls of the righteous are in the hand of god. those -- be destroyed but the name liveth for ever more. let us pray. almighty god, creator and sustainer, we offer to you endless of thanks thanksgiving and praise today. we reremember a time of great tyranny in our world. we remember world war ii. we also remember those who stood their ground against great tyranny. those who fought here at home and on the battle fronts to ensure that tyranny would not prevail. we thank you that in the hour of need you gave men and women the strength and resolve to stand no matter the cost. may those brave souls who still remain here with us feel today your hand of favor and strength. for those who remain with us tod
, welcome to the others watching. appreciative to the bank of america for making these conversations possible. we had a great partnership this year, including conventions, election night, and so we're very, very excited to be ail to bring these substantive conversations about the most important issues driving washington to you, thanks to the bank of america. thank you, john, and thank you to your colleagues. you may have gotten cards. we'll be bringing you into the conversation, think about what you're going to ask. without further adieu, we'll bring in bob woodward. mr. woodward? [applause] >> thank you. saving seats with my notes. i'll pick those up. >> which is your chair? >> you get the daddy chair. >> okay, thank you, thank you. >> so the price of politics, which has become a best seller, as all your books do, looked at the last cliff negotiations over the previous grand bargain that didn't quite get over the finish line. what does that teach us about the current cliff negotiations? >> well, it's ground hog day. the question who is playing bill murray? i mean such a repetition.
to what's going on in america, jim understands that if we don't make some changes we're going to lose our way of life. that's what's driven him above all else, to try to keep our country a place to be place where you can be anything. i look forward to working with jim in the private sector. from a personal point of view, we've had a great ride together. it has been fun. it has been challenging, and i think we put south carolina on the map in different ways at different times, and to people back in south carolina, i hope if you get to see jim anytime soon, just say "thank you." because whether you agree with him or not, he was doing what he thought was best for south carolina and the united states. at the end of the day, that's as good as it gets. because if you're doing what you really believe in and you're not worried about being the most popular and people getting mad ought, then you can really do a good job in washington. to the people back in south carolina, everything jim has tried to do has been motivated about the changing the country. if you get a chance to run into him anytime so
the united states of america. >> tomorrow night, watch the farewell speech by republican senator dick lugar and democratic representative lynn woolsey of california. we will also show you a tribute in the u.s. house to outgoing caliber and california members of cameras.. join us at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. later a look at the dodd-frank law and regulations. >> this is c-span3 with politics and public affairs programming throughout the week. and every weekend, 40 hours a people and events ,-com,-com ma telling the american story on american history tv. get schedules in the past programs our website. you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> tomorrow a draft constitution by mohammed morsi. it would expand his constitutional powers. supporters and opponents of president mohammed morsi. next, we'll talk about developments in the country and security throughout the region with an expert on the muslim brotherhood and a former israeli ambassador to egypt. this is an hour and a half. >> looking at the political competition with the egyptian and the egyptian society, what is lik
broken branch: how the congress is failing america," "it's worse than it looks how the american constitutional system collided with the new politics of extremism." he's been quotedded probably too many times for any data base to collect in one place. in the 1990s, there was an article i was in somewhere quoted, and you were quoted, and your quote was i have no idea. i thought to myself, you can get quoted for saying that, you achieved a unique status in washington, d.c.. i congratulate you on that. [laughter] the third speaker will be bill who is currently in the policy public practice, serving assistant to george w. bush in the white house, a policy adviser to bill frist, and chief of staff to joe pitts of pennsylvania. he has a very, very deep experience both in the house and senate, making him unique. he's made of top of the pyramid in both chambers, and he was particularly active at the time on the issues concerning senate rules and precedent. he's working on the sontorum campaign, "culture: upstream from politics," and other series. the fourth and final speaker is brian dar
individuals. er is slams of america for -- servants of america for decades who made a difference, who had to come up with tough solutions to very complex problems. and it's been a real privilege for me to be with them in approaching what this coalition and those who aren't here today has brought together to try to inject some energy at the right place at the right time. so next up here will be senator sam nunn, longstanding chairman in senate armed services, who understands our country and our national security as well or better than anyone i have ever worked with. senator none -- senator nunn? [applause] >> well, first, thanks to pete peterson for getting this group together and for so much else that pete and michael and the peterson foundation have done in terms of bringing attention to the fiscal challenge we face and mobilizing support for a rational and sane fiscal policy. second, admiral mullen, thank you for your tremendous leadership both in the military and as a citizen in the recent months. you have led the way, and your statement that basically the biggest risk that we have to
ricans. in america the latino population is primarily mexican origin. but one thing that is unique about the latino population in arizona, a lot of them are recent arrivals. not necessarily foreign-born but have might grated from, say, california, texas, new mexico, because of job opportunities in arizona over the last decade or so. but that's not unlike perhaps the white population, too. it's very hard to find native arizonans. so, a lot of the people there are transplants from elsewhere and i think that explains a lot as to why the latino voters are still the sleeping giant in arizona. we saw them surge in new mexico and of course colorado and nevada, but in arizona they're still asleep some people ask why. i think in part it's because they have not established rooting, the roots in the community like in, say, california or texas. >> go into the numbers a little bit. what percentage of the population -- we heard the percentage of electorate. give us a sense of the percentage of the population, what they -- growth rate, expansion. >> in arizona, approximately one-third of the population
of the tea party freshman andy also you know believe that this presented the republicans and indeed america with a great opportunity. his belief for example was that this would be a perfect run for entitlement reform. if you are are going after entitlement reform ideally you have the bipartisanship specifically at democratic president so they could not walk away from it. and so, he believed that he could leverage the deep conservatism of the tea party. but he has failed to do so and the tea party freshman with whom i have spent a great deal of time and i have spent time with an awful lot of them, liked him personally and found him admirable in the way is a genial ceo but certainly not as there are real leader. that has been implicitly clear throughout the 112 congress. eric cantor the majority leader is a bit different, somewhat younger than boehner, a very clever guy, very very ambitious. he has his own channel to the obama white house as he and vice president biden are very close and i think they found they need each other i believe it was biden and this would not surprise any of you that
what was right. when america was plunged into the crucible of world war ii, nowhere was the attack on pearl harbor more keenly felt than in the japanese-american community. it's difficult today to recall the full intensity of fear, of confucian, a suspicion of recrimination, even hatred that are merged in the days and weeks and months following a surprise attack 71 years ago. and despite the clear injustice in the dinner relocating so many of the japanese community. second-generation americans of japanese ancestry, finney said demanded the rate to demand this country in time of war, like other american citizens. and to our country's credit, their voices were heard, leading to the creation of all nisei unit commanded by caucasian officers. courage, prowess in battle, trust in one another and determination made these units legendary. the hundredth infantry battalion commander for 42nd regimental combat team with military intelligence service, the mis. these are not just good unit for unique because of ethnic homogeneity. they were premier fighting units among the best in u.s. history
in the northeast. that's what being the united states of america is all about. with that, mr. president, i yield the floor. ms. mikulski: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from maryland. ms. mikulski: mr. president recognition to rebut theburn amendment and also tofer twoefore i my colleagues, particularly those who have amendments. i want to thank them for their cooperation and being willing to offer them and speak tonight on both sides of the aisle. and i also note that the gentlelady from new york and the gentleman from connecticut also wish to speak. mr. president, senators -- their states who have been very hard hit should have the opportunity to speak. i'm going to take my rebuttal of the coburn amendments and just abbreviate them. with the exception of being willing to accept the amendment where you can't get emergency assistance if you are a tax cheater or if you've passed away, with the exception of a funeral benefit i really object to the coburn amendment. my objections have been so well articulated by the gentleman from new york, mr. schumer; by the gentleman from new
, the bill of rights creation and reconstruction, america's constitution a biography and most recently america's unwritten constitution, the president's and decibels we live by. the honorable clarence thomas has served as an associate justice of the supreme court of the united states for nearly 21 years. he attended conceptual cemetery and received an a.b. from the college of the holy cross and his j.d. from yale law school. he served as an assistant attorney general of missouri from 1974 to 1977, an attorney with the monsanto company from 77 to 79 and legislative assistant to senator john danforth from 1979 to 1981. from 1981 to 1982 he served as assistant secretary for civil rights in the u.s. department of education and chairman of the u.s. equal opportunity commission from 1982 to 1990. he became a judge of the u.s. court of appeals and in the district of columbia circuit in 1990. president bush nominated him as associate justice of the supreme court and he took his seat on october 23, 1991. ladies and gentlemen please welcome justice thomas and professor amar to the stage. [applau
journalism has reported that the new america foundation. two men have returned from the country into the to the west can do more to help the syrian people. [inaudible conversations] >> welcome, everyone. welcome to c-span on the audience. i am very excited about today's events. we have two people with us that have recently come from syria that are able to give us an insight on the perspective of something that is hard to come by. in the context of the syria. to my far right is mohammed ghanem, he has a bachelor's degree in english literature, as well as graduate degree in translation from damascus university. he went on to earn a degree in conflict transformation from the center of justice and peace at the eastern mennonite university in harrisburg, virginia, and he has fought as assistant professor at princeton university. he is a long-term activists. he was active in the early days as a strategist for nonviolence. he is currently taking on the role of administrator consoles which we intend to focus on today. to my immediate right is ihan tanir. he is a washington dc correspond
one of the most attractive and livable cities in america. he worked with the general asystemmably, then-governor ed whitcom to merger the governments of indianapolis and marion county to provide common, essential services more efficiently, a concept then called "unigov." it wasn't without controversy because of dick lugar -- but because of dick lugar -- but because it did lugar's vision, careful careful initiation's ana decisive actions indianapolis model for other cities across thes t nation., but the law took effect in 1970 indianapolis population rose 7 from93 400 to 76,000 to 793,000e moving from the 25th largest city to one of the nations second largest cities literally overnight. when i think of the numerous positive changes in indianapolis overee the past 40 years, i see the fulfillment of the vision ow then mayor dick lugar. now the midwest has a way of producing men and women of sense and decency. not all of us fall in that category. sometimes bear his question buto we do have individuals who have ability to see through the heart of the matter and to resolve and find a wa
done? [inaudible] >> yet, soccer. so they say that cheney spoke a foot stadium. what has america done for us? i will admit in a pillowcase comment i was frustrated by that and say americans invent and how thick dignities and education and the fact that there are young people alive to watch football is largely because of the people of the united states. that's kind of her difference. we've chosen a path of investment, human capital. it pays off in the long term rather than the immediacy of a football stadium. we've seen over the past several years 30 plus% decline in hiv/aids. that's not exclusively in the united states feared where the largest contributor to the end is something we should be proud of. it's huge that people in africa have that. >> last weekon monday or senator kirsten gillibrand delivered testimony on the hill and told stories of families who lost children to hurricane cindy. those hit hardest by the film testified by the senate environment and public works committee. new york, new jersey, rhode island, maryland and delaware lawmakers talked about the impact in the ong
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18